Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (2022)

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Spam Musubi is a famous Hawaii snack made from Spam, rice, and nori. It’s portable, affordable, and tasty! It’s the most popular way to eat Spam in Hawaii.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (1)

What’s Hawaii’s favorite snack? Spam Musubi!

What Is Spam Musubi?

Spam Musubi is a local Hawaii snack.It’s a small, handheld treat made from three key ingredients: Spam, rice, and nori.

A slice of Spam is placed on top of a block of rice, and the whole thing is wrapped in nori. It’s affordable, convenient, and super onolicious.

You can find Spam Musubi everywhere in Hawaii be it 7-Eleven, supermarket/deli, or plate lunch spot. You can also make it at home.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (2)Many Spam Musubi options at Musubi Cafe Iyasume (Oahu)

Where Did Spam Musubi Come From?

Spam got popular in Hawaii right after World War II.

The military consumed a ton of Spam during the war years. Because Hawaii had a large military presence, there was lots of Spam in Hawaii. People loved the taste, and Hawaii eventually “adopted” Spam. Spam musubi was invented by a local Japanese lady in Hawaii.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (3)Spam, Egg, and Bacon Musubi

Why Is Spam Musubi So Popular In Hawaii?

Two key factors:

Outdoors
Hawaii is a very outdoors type of place and Spam Musubi is the ultimate portable snack. Pack it in your bag before you go hiking, bring it to the beach (toss a few musubis in your beach bag and eat after you come out of the water). Spam Musubi doesn’t need to be refrigerated, it’s durable, and really hits the spot after outdoors physical activity. Just don’t forget to bring water or something to drink.

Families/Groups
Hawaii is family and group oriented. It’s not unusual to see multiple generations living together in on home. Spam Musubi is a hit at group events like family potluck gatherings, garage parties, bake sales (alongside butter mochi!) and especially at after school soccer games. It’s easy to eat and everyone enjoys it. No hassle, no frills, just really tasty.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (4)Spam Musubi at Yama’s Fish Market (Oahu)

Spam in Hawaii

Sometimes people make fun of Hawaii for loving Spam so much. As a local that splits time between Hawaii and mainland, making fun of Hawaii/Spam might seem funny, but it’s not. It feels like a dated joke that only someone who doesn’t “get” Hawaii would make. If you want to seem like someone who “gets” Hawaii, just act all cool and nonchalant about Spam ^_^

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (5)Spam (and Egg) Musubi at (Oahu)

We love Spam very much and it shows up seemingly everywhere in Hawaii. If not in the form of a musubi, it comes on local spam, egg, and rice breakfast plates (even McDonald’s offers it), sliced in bowls of saimin, and mixed into fried rice (kimchee-Spam fried rice is super good).

(Video) How to Make Spam Musubi

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (6)Mini bento with Spam musubi from Musubi Cafe Iyasume (Oahu)

We even have an annual festival dedicated to Spam (it’s called Waikiki Spam Jam and a bunch of restaurants make new/fun Spam dishes for the event). On the flip side, not everyone in Hawaii eats Spam. I don’t think my grandma has ever tried Spam!

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (7)Spam Musubis from Ookini Onigiri (Oahu)

Variations on Spam Musubi

The classic is a trio combo of rice/spam/nori. But there are many super delicious variations. Here are a few:

Furikake Spam Musubi
Rolling the rice furikake before you top it with the Spam slice. Some places also mix the furikake directly with the rice, so you get furikake-speckled rice.

Half-Wrap Spam Musubi
Cut the nori sheet lengthwise into quarters (instead of half) so that either end of the musubi is exposed.

Spam-in-the-Middle Musubi
This is when the Spam is tucked between two layers of rice (instead of being on top of the rice). You do a half layer of rice, sprinkle furikake (optional), then the Spam, more furikake, then a top layer of rice. Then wrap the whole thing in nori.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (8)Spam Musubi (mini size) as part of a bento at Kawamoto Store (Big Island)

Mini Spam Musubi
These are just whole Spam Musubi cut into halves or quarters (often seen as part of a bento). Minis can also be made with a mini musubi mold.

Saucy Spam Musubi
Those who like crispy and saucy Spam (I do!) can pan fry Spam slices in shoyu-sugar or teriyaki sauce before making the musubi.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (9)Spam (with egg, avocado, and unagi!) Musubi at Musubi Cafe Iyasume (Oahu)

Deluxe Spam Musubi
The kids like to call this “premium” musubi. It’s when you take a Spam Musubi and add on additional layers of toppings. Common toppings include: egg omelet (made Japanese-style, and sliced thin), bacon, cheese, avocado slices, and even unagi.

Non-Spam Musubi
In supermarkets and 7-Eleven Hawai, Spam Musubi is usually stored under heaters (to keep the musubi warm). Sitting next to the Spam Musubis are many other kinds of musubi that look exactly the same, except the Spam is replaced with a different type of meat. You’ll see hot dogs (cut in half, two halves atop the rice), teriyaki tofu, and teriyaki chicken.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (10)Spam Musubi at (Oahu)

When Do You Eat Spam Musubi?

When? There are so many ways to eat Spam Musubi…

  • Eat it for breakfast! (The same way you would a breakfast burrito.)
  • Eat it for snack! Our school cafeteria would sell Spam Musubis for $1.50 and we’d get them for snacks.
  • Eat it as part of a lunch! One Spam musubi is a snack, and two is lunch.
  • Bring it to a potluck/garage party! Odds are someone is going to bring a giant tray of Spam Musubis (usually cut in half for “party-size”) to that potluck party.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (11)Spam Musubi at Yama’s Fish Market (Oahu)

How Do You Eat Spam Musubi?

With your hands, please ^_^

(Video) Why We Eat: Spam Musubi

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (12)Spam Musubi at Waiola Shave Ice (Oahu)

If you buy Spam Musubi to-go, it’s usually wrapped in plastic. Use one hand to peel the plastic, and the other hand to hold and bite the Spam Musubi. Always want to keep one hand clean just in case.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (13)Housemade Spam musubi at Mill House (Maui)

Fancy Spam Musubi

Many nicer restaurants (both in Hawaii and outside Hawaii) make their own in-house Spam! It’s a pretty neat concept – it doesn’t taste like the “real” Spam, but you do feel healthier/less bad for eating fancy Spam heheh.

Restaurant housemade Spam is used to make fancy Spam musubis, and is also served sliced over rice (essentially a deconstructed Spam musubi). In Hawaii, check out MW Restaurant on Oahu (pro tip: MW’s to-go lunch bentos are an amazing value) and Mill House in Maui. In San Francisco, visit Trailblazer Tavern and Liholiho Yacht Club (here’s my full post about Hawaii food in SF). In NYC, visit Noreetuh in the East Village.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (14)Spam Musubi (and Chicken and Salmon Musubi!) at (Oahu)

Where To Buy Spam Musubi

This is but a short list of the many, many places in Hawaii where you can find Spam Musubi. Pay attention and you’ll spot them in the most unexpected places (shave ice shops, included) ^_^

  • Musubi Cafe Iyasume (Oahu)
  • (Oahu)
  • Mana Musubi (Oahu)
  • Fort Ruger Market (Oahu)
  • Kawamoto Store (Big Island)
  • Da Kitchen (Maui)
  • Pono Market (Kauai)
  • 7-Eleven Hawaii (All Islands)
  • Foodland (All Islands)
Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (15)

How To Make Spam Musubi

Ingredients

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (16)

The first thing you need is a Spam Musubi mold – this is a good one.

Then you’ll need the 3 key ingredients:

  • Cooked rice – Japanese rice short or medium grain rice, I like Koda Farms. If you’re in Honolulu make sure to visit The Rice Factory.
  • Spam – Spam Classic or Spam Lite (low sodium).
  • Nori sheets – They come in packs of 10 or 50.
  • Furikake – Optional but I always add furikake (can sprinkle it on top of the rice or even mix it with the rice).

Important Notes

There are no exact measurements when it comes to Spam Musubi. There is no right or wrong. It’s all about personal preference.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (17)

You can use white rice or brown rice or mix rice (aka hapa rice). Some people like big fat slices of Spam, others like skinny crispy slices.

How much rice to press in the mold? Up to you. Some days I make super thin Spam Musubi and use a 1:1 ratio of rice and Spam. Other days I use a 3:1 ratio.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (18)

There are however, general guidelines for the “classic” Spam Musubi:

  • Cook three cups of rice for each one can of Spam.
  • Cut each can of Spam into eight slices.
  • Cut each nori sheet lengthwise in half for Method #1 and into thirds for Method #2 (more on each Method below).

Cooking Instructions

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (19)

Made the Spam Musubi sauce by mixing together equal parts soy sauce and sugar in a small bowl.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (20)

Pan fry (both sides) the slices of Spam for 2 minutes on medium heat. Add the soy saucesugar mixture. Pan fry an additional 2 minutes to let the Spam soak up the sauce. Set aside.

Next, decide which assemble style you prefer…Spam on top or Spam in the middle? Spam on top is the traditional one. But Spam in the middle is easier to eat and less prone to falling apart. Spam in the middle is the style I prefer.

Assembly Method #1 (Spam On Top)

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (21)

Place the musubi mold on a cutting board. Use a rice paddle to scoop the rice and press it into the mold. Use the mold handle to really pack in the rice.

(Video) Best Spam Musubi Recipe | How To Make Homemade Hawaiian Spam Musubi With Musubi Mold

You don’t want to smash the rice, but you want to press firmly enough so that the rice doesn’t fall apart later.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (22)

Top the rice with a sprinkle of furikake (optional) and a slice of Spam. Remove the mold.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (23)

Wrap the nori strip (the one you cut into thirds) around the entire thing. Go eat.

Assembly Method #2 (Spam In The Middle)

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (24)

Lay the nori strip (already cut in half) on a table. Put the musubi mold in the center of the nori strip.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (25)

Sprinkle furikake on top of the rice (optional).

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (26)

Add the Spam.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (27)

Sprinkle more furikake on top of the Spam (optional). Add another layer of rice. Use the mold handle to press down the rice.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (28)

Remove the mold.

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (29)

Use the nori to wrap around the entire Spam musubi. Ready to eat.

Neat tip: If you have trouble getting the nori to stick together at the end, use a few grains of rice as a “sticker.”

Spam Musubi, A Hawaii Snack! - Onolicious Hawaiʻi (30)

Spam Musubi is easy (and fun) to make. It was one of the first things I learned to “cook” as a kid. In college we would have Spam Musubi making parties/get togethers. I hope you enjoy this recipe ^_^

Common Spam Musubi Questions

No musubi mold (or don’t want to buy a mold)?

Almost all local households keep a musubi mold in their kitchen. If you plan to make Spam Musubi more than once, it’s worth buying a musubi mold (you can also use it to make many other types of musubis).

But there is a workaround (which comes in handy when I’m making musubi at a friend’s house on the mainland). Use the Spam can! Yes! Don’t throw away the can when you open the Spam. Rinse the can. Then get a piece of plastic/Saran wrap and use that to line the interior of the Spam can (make sure the plastic wrap is big enough so that a few inches hang over/out the exterior of the can).

(Video) Spam Musubi | Classic Hawaiian Recipe

Layer in the rice/furikake/spam. Use a spoon to press down firmly so that all the layers are tightly packed into the can. Then pull the entire musubi up (along with the plastic wrap – use the excess plastic wrap to help pull it out) on to a cutting board. Remove the plastic and the nori to roll up the Spam musubi!

How to store leftovers?

Sometimes I make Spam musubi for just the two of us. We usually eat 2 musubi each for lunch. That leaves 4 musubi (assuming we used a whole can of Spam cut into 8 slices). Best solution is to make only as much as you’re planning to eat. Save the other 4 Spam slices and assemble the remaining musubi tomorrow (refrigerate and microwave leftover rice). That way you get “fresh” musubi with the crisp nori sheets, hot rice, and saucy Spam.

But if there are leftovers, best thing to do is wrap them individually or store in a sealed container. When you’re ready to eat, remove the wrap, and put the musubi on a plate. Drape a slightly wet paper towel over the musubi (this keeps the rice from drying out) and microwave for one minute.

We’re supposed to add soy sauce AND sugar to the Spam?

As crazy as it sounds, yes! I know Spam is already sooo salty. But adding this Spam musubi sauce (aka soy sauce and sugar) is essential to getting the right Spam musubi “taste.”

It’s easy! Just mix together equal parts soy sauce and sugar. Then pour it over the Spam as your pan frying it. The sugar caramelizes it a bit and the soy sauce…well…the soy sauce goes so perfect with rice.

Spam Musubi Recipe

See below and enjoy ^_^

Instructions

    1. Prepare the Spam. Cut the Spam into 8 slices.
    2. Prepare the sauce. Mix the soy sauce and sugar in a bowl.
    3. Cook the Spam. In a skillet over medium heat, lay the Spam slices in a single layer. Pan fry each side for a minute. Pour the soy sauce-sugar mixture over all the Spam. Let the Spam soak up the sauce. The sauce will get thicker and caramelize a bit. Pan fry an additional 2 minutes. Turn off heat and remove the Spam to a plate. You want the Spam to be both a bit crispy and saucy.
    4. Assemble the musubi. There are two popular methods. Method #1 is Spam on top. Method #2 is Spam in the middle. You can stick with one method try both and see which you prefer.
    5. Method #1 (Spam on top). Cut each nori sheet into thirds (making three long strips). Place the musubi maker in the center of the nori strip. Use a rice paddle to scoop rice directly into the mold (enough to fill the mold about 1-inch high). Use the musubi mold handle to press the rice down firmly (you don't want to smash the rice, but you want it packed together enough so that the rice doesn't fall apart when you pick up the musubi). Sprinkle furikake on the rice. Top with one slice of Spam. Remove the musubi mold and then wrap the nori around the rice.
    6. Method #2 (Spam in middle). Cut each nori sheet half (making two long strips). Place the musubi mold in the center of the nori strip. Use a rice paddle to scoop rice directly into the mold (enough to fill the mold 1/2-inch high). Use the musubi mold handle to press the rice down firmly. Sprinkle furikake on the rice. Top with one slice of Spam. Sprinkle furikake on the Spam. Top with another layer of rice. Press down with the musubi mold handle to make sure everything is tightly in place. Remove the musubi mold and then wrap the nori around the rice.
    7. Eat and enjoy ^_^
(Video) How to make Spam Musubi Recipe | Classic and famous Hawaiian snack and lunch food

FAQs

How many cans of Spam does Hawaii consume? ›

According to the SPAM website, people in Hawaii consume more SPAM than any state at seven million cans a year. The SPAM website explains Hawaii's love affair with SPAM began in World War II when soldiers were served the salty lunch meat because it didn't require refrigeration and had a long shelf life.

What is Spam musubi sauce made of? ›

What is spam musubi sauce made of? The key to a good spam musubi sauce is the perfect balance of savory-sweet, which coats the spam in a beautiful glaze. My mom's spam musubi sauce is a teriyaki-inspired mixture, made of shoyu (soy sauce), mirin (rice wine), dark brown sugar, & sesame oil.

Is Spam musubi Japanese or Hawaiian? ›

During this period, Spam began to make its way into local dishes. Barbara Funamura, a Japanese-American woman from Hawaii, is credited with having invented Spam musubi, a slice of grilled Spam on top of a block of rice, wrapped together with nori.

What does Spam musubi taste like? ›

But Moore's examine that salty from this glam salty from the soy sauce smells fishy from the wrapper

Why is it called Spam musubi? ›

The Garden Island in 1983 described it as, "Spam and rice, two local favorites, are combined in an enormous musubi (rice ball) wrapped in nori (sheets of dried seaweed)," with Funamura quoted, "That's the Spam musubi." Eventually Funamura's musubi was made using a box mold, taking on its familiar form.

Which country eats Spam the most? ›

The tiny western Pacific island of Guam is known mainly for its U.S. military outpost; but it's also far and away the world's largest consumer of Spam. After the majority of the U.S. military force that occupied Guam during World War II left, the canned, preserved meat the soldiers ate stayed put.

Why Do Hawaiians eat so much Spam? ›

The true root of the island's love for SPAM® products goes back to World War II, when the luncheon meat was served to GIs. By the end of the war, SPAM® products were adopted into local culture, with Fried SPAM® Classic and rice becoming a popular meal.

What does Spam stand for? ›

SPAM is an acronym: Special Processed American Meat.

Can you leave Spam musubi out overnight? ›

In terms of where to store the finished Spam musubis, keep them at room temperature or cool room temperature if possible. Refrigeration is not the move here, since the rice becomes sad, dry and hard. I highly recommend serving on the same day, since next day Spam musubis aren't the same.

Is Spam musubi served hot or cold? ›

The best thing about musubi is that they're great eaten warm, room temperature or even cold from the fridge! Which makes them a great snack to keep on hand for throughout the week. If you do want to rewarm them, you can pop them in the microwave for a couple of seconds.

What meat is Spam? ›

It may come as a pleasant surprise to learn that SPAM is not the preservative-packed mystery meat you might think it is. In fact, SPAM only contains six ingredients! And the brand's website lists them all. They are: pork with ham meat added (that counts as one), salt, water, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrite.

Did soldiers eat Spam? ›

The difficulty of delivering fresh meat to the front during World War II saw Spam become a ubiquitous part of the U.S. soldier's diet. It became variously referred to as "ham that didn't pass its physical", "meatloaf without basic training", and "Special Army Meat".

What does Spam taste like? ›

What Does Spam Taste Like? Spam is truly delicious. It's salty and a little spicy with a flavor most similar to ham and a texture close to bologna.

What do you eat Spam musubi with? ›

SPAM is eaten in many ways, but in Hawaii it is best enjoyed sliced into pieces, pan fried or deep fried and served with a bed of steamed rice. The Amazing SPAM Musubi!

How much is Spam musubi in Hawaii? ›

Spam Musubi
Half (20-25)$39.95
Full (35-40)$79.95

How many calories are in a Spam musubi? ›

Spam Musubi (1 serving) contains 45g total carbs, 45g net carbs, 7g fat, 7g protein, and 280 calories.

What Spam is popular Hawaii? ›

In Hawaii, there is perhaps only one food that is more engrained in the island culture than pineapple – and that food is Spam. This quintessential canned ham product manufactured in Minnesota was introduced to the islands during the 1940s, and has become a wildly popular staple food across the islands.

Do you eat the seaweed on Spam musubi? ›

Eating SPAM Musubi - the Hawaiian Way - YouTube

Do Japanese people eat Spam musubi? ›

In Japan, Spam is used in onigiri (rice balls), and is served alongside eggs. In the Philippines it was the main source of meat for American soldiers stationed there during World War II.

Is Spam good for a diabetic? ›

Spam is a type of processed meat, and thus eating it may be associated with a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, COPD, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer.

What state sells most Spam? ›

Idaho is the most spammed state in the country, with a 93.8 percent rate of spam in its e-mail stream, according to security firm Symantec's MessageLabs Intelligence. For every 100 e-mail messages received, in other words, about 94 of them belong in a spam folder.

What are the 15 flavors of Spam? ›

Today, there are 13 different varieties of Spam — classic, less sodium, lite, hot & spicy, Black Pepper, Jalapeño, spread, singles, singles lite, hickory smoke, bacon, cheese, and roasted turkey. The Jalapeño and Black Pepper selections were introduced for Spam's 75th anniversary.

Does McDonald's serve Spam in Hawaii? ›

McDonald's Hawaii offers a special menu of items you can only find in Hawaii. There are breakfast platters loaded with Spam and Portuguese sausage, a dessert menu with hot haupia (coconut pudding) and taro pies, fried apple pies (only state where you can get the pies fried in the US!), and much more.

What is Hawaii's national dish? ›

Saimin. Saimin, Hawaii's national dish, is a soup with thin wheat noodles and a dashi broth with shrimp, pork and eggs. Japanese, Chinese and Filipino cultural influences come together in a flavorful blend served hot and eaten with chopsticks.

Do chefs like Spam? ›

Spam is even Top Chef-approved, as recent champion Brooke Williamson serves Spam musubi at her L.A. eatery, Da Kikokiko. Also, after doing some research, RealClearLife can confirm that Spam is pretty good on pizza.

What is spam made of really? ›

What sets Spam apart from other products that are made from chopped meats that are cooked and pressed together (we're thinking about scrapple): Spam is made from pork shoulder and pork ham, with no other scraps from the hog. Pork shoulder is considered a high-quality cut of pork today, although in 1937, it was not.

Does spam contain milk? ›

Yes, Spam Lite Canned Meat is dairy-free.

Does canned spam expire? ›

While most canned foods will last indefinitely as long as the can is in good condition, canned meats retain their quality from two to five years. Kept in a cool, dark place, spam can be consumed indefinitely. However, spam from cans with signs of damage such as dents and holes is unsafe to eat.

Does Spam musubi reheat well? ›

To reheat: place leftover Spam musubis on a microwave-safe plate and cover with a damp paper towel. Reheat in the microwave for 1 minute. Keep in mind that the nori will not be as crisp as the first day it was made, but still just as delicious!

How do you Saran Wrap Spam musubi? ›

Lift the plastic wrap on the bottom and remove the musubi from the container. Cut the musubi according to the size of the Spam. Wrap it with dry seaweed. Wrap it with plastic wrap tightly.

Can you freeze Spam musubi? ›

Storing & Freezing

Storing: Spam musubi is best served fresh and slightly warm. But if you have leftovers, wrap each individual musubi in plastic wrap and store in the fridge for up to 4 days. Freezing: Let the spam musubi with egg cool completely, then wrap each one in plastic wrap, followed by a layer of foil.

What is the meaning of musubi? ›

musubi, in the Shintō religion of Japan, the power of becoming or creation. A number of deities are associated with musubi.

How do you get sticky rice? ›

Place rice over a pot of rapidly simmering water (don't allow water to touch sieve) and steam, covered, for 15 minutes. Remove lid and flip rice over. Continue steaming, covered, for 10 minutes, until rice is translucent and glossy. Taste to make sure rice is completely cooked; it may take up to 10 minutes more.

Can you make Spam musubi the night before? ›

The spam is grilled until crispy, perfectly caramelized with soy sauce and sugar, and wrapped with sushi rice. Made ahead of time, these Spam musubi are perfect for your lunchbox, appetizer platter, or potluck. They are also a fantastic game-day snack.

Can dogs eat Spam? ›

The short answer is no, dogs can't eat Spam safely. Spam is made from pork, which isn't toxic for dogs on its own. But Spam also contains such high levels of sodium and fat, plus a number of preservatives and additives, that it's not a safe food to feed to your dog on any sort of regular basis.

How healthy is Spam? ›

SPAM doesn't provide very much nutrition value for the calories it contains. As evidenced by the Nutrition Facts label, there aren't many vitamins and minerals and you can attain a much higher dose of these by eating a healthier meal like a salad or beans and rice.

Why do people eat Spam? ›

Spam is versatile and convenient. It can be used in many dishes, from "classic festive musubi" and "BBQ glazed spam burgers" to cobb salads and paninis. So it provides many meal options for the budget-conscious family.

What did soldiers call Spam? ›

As Spam became an integral part of the GI diet, troops gave the meat a variety of nicknames like “ham that didn't pass its physical,” “meatloaf without basic training,” and “Special Army Meat.” The grease from the luncheon meat was used to lubricate weapons and waterproof boots, and the empty cans could be filled with ...

Does Spam have bone? ›

All Spam's ingredients are mixed

According to How Products are Made, Spam starts looking less like pigs and more like Spam when the meat is sliced from the bone — a process done by hand — and ground into 8,000-pound batches.

Is corned beef a Spam? ›

Spam and corned beef are very different products in terms of their ingredients, textures, and flavors. Spam is a canned product made with pork shoulder and ham, while corned beef is a preserved meat product made using beef brisket that has been brined in salt and spices.

Is SPAM like hot dog? ›

It's made with pork shoulder and ham, along with salt, water, sugar, potato starch, and nitrites. It's basically made from the same stuff as hot dogs.

Is SPAM like bologna? ›

SPAM has significantly fewer ingredients

Bologna, on the other hand, is a little more mystifying. That's because the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) requires that all processed meats be reduced to tiny particles so you can't see exactly what's inside that slice of bologna from the grocery store.

Who eats the most SPAM by state? ›

Hawaiians eat more Spam than any other state and know it as “Hawaiian steak.” The canned meat is on breakfast platters at McDonald's there, and grocery stores stock Spam in a wider array of flavors than those on the U.S. mainland. One reason: It's easier and cheaper to bring in packaged meat than fresh meat.

How do Hawaiians eat Spam? ›

A favorite Hawaiian way to eat Spam is in the form of a musubi (pronounced moo-soo-bee, with no accent). It is a fried slice of spam on rice pressed together to form a small block, then wrapped with a strip of seaweed.

What side dishes go with Spam? ›

Comfort Meal – SPAM, potatoes, Jalapeños, and onions & Naneeskadi (Navajo tortillas). SPAM Sandwich – Slice the SPAM and add mayo, lettuce, cheese, and pickles to your bread. Fried SPAM – Slice and fry it until crispy on the edges. Serve with fried potatoes and a dippy fried egg on top of it all.

Is Spam popular in Japan? ›

That's because while it has a less than stellar reputation in many Western countries, spam is beloved in much of Asia. According to recent market research, the Asia-Pacific region accounts for some 39% of luncheon meat sales, with China, South Korea and Japan among the top consumers.

Are there 7/11 in Hawaii? ›

7-Eleven Hawaii is unlike any of the 7-Eleven locations on the mainland. The Hawaii locations are full of local treats and snacks ranging from spam musubi to manapua and even lilikoi and POG Slurpees!

How many calories are in a 711 musubi? ›

from 7 Eleven. * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
...
Additional Serving Size Recommendations.
Vitamin A 0%Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0%Iron 0%

How much is tray of Spam musubi from L&L? ›

Serving Size Cal/ServingMedium 15‑20 servings
Chicken Katsu Musubi1 pc/5.2 oz. 320 cal48.99
BBQ Chicken Musubi1 pc/6.3 oz. 250 cal48.99
SPAM® Musubi1 pc/5.2 oz. 280 cal48.99
Side Order
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How many calories is 2 Spam musubi? ›

There are 680 calories in 2 pieces of Ono Hawaiian BBQ Spam Musubi. * The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a serving of food contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

How many calories are in 2 slices of Spam? ›

Other sizes: 100 g - 308kcal, 1 oz - 87kcal, 2 slices - 176kcal, more...

How much calories should I eat? ›

How many calories should I eat a day? Adult females need anywhere from 1,600 to 2,400 calories a day and adult males need anywhere from 2,000 to 3,000 calories a day, according to the USDA's latest “Dietary Guidelines for Americans” report released in 2020.

How much Spam is sold annually? ›

Domestically, according to the Chicago-based research firm IRI, Spam sales increased from $218 million in 2017 to $297 million in 2020, a 36% jump. Sales retreated last year to $268 million.

What country loves Spam? ›

The pre-cooked tins of pork meat are the stuff of jokes, lunch boxes, wartime memories and, here in South Korea, a low-key, national love affair. Spam has become a staple of South Korean life, and the country is now the biggest consumer of it outside the US.

Where is Spam eaten? ›

Spam is hugely popular in the Asia-Pacific region. According to the BBC, "It has been a household name in Hawaii since it was introduced in 1937. It can be found on menus across the islands. In South Korea, it was introduced by the U.S. Army during the Korean War, when food was scarce.

Do they eat Spam in Japan? ›

That's because while it has a less than stellar reputation in many Western countries, spam is beloved in much of Asia. According to recent market research, the Asia-Pacific region accounts for some 39% of luncheon meat sales, with China, South Korea and Japan among the top consumers.

What does Spam stand for? ›

SPAM is an acronym: Special Processed American Meat.

What are the 15 flavors of Spam? ›

Today, there are 13 different varieties of Spam — classic, less sodium, lite, hot & spicy, Black Pepper, Jalapeño, spread, singles, singles lite, hickory smoke, bacon, cheese, and roasted turkey. The Jalapeño and Black Pepper selections were introduced for Spam's 75th anniversary.

Why is Spam so salty? ›

The reason that Spam tastes so salty is because it has that spam has a lot of salt in it. An article on Healthline.com says that the original Spam recipe has 32% of the recommended daily allowance for sodium. Blame the inclusion of so much salt on the need to create a product that has a long shelf life.

Is Spam good for a diabetic? ›

Spam is a type of processed meat, and thus eating it may be associated with a higher risk of diabetes, heart disease, COPD, high blood pressure and certain types of cancer.

What meat is Spam? ›

It may come as a pleasant surprise to learn that SPAM is not the preservative-packed mystery meat you might think it is. In fact, SPAM only contains six ingredients! And the brand's website lists them all. They are: pork with ham meat added (that counts as one), salt, water, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrite.

Is Spam cured meat? ›

Spam contains six ingredients: a mixture of pork and ham meat, salt, water, potato starch, sugar, and sodium nitrite, a food preservative added to bacon, hot dogs, cured meats, sausage, and smoked fish.

What is Spam made of really? ›

What sets Spam apart from other products that are made from chopped meats that are cooked and pressed together (we're thinking about scrapple): Spam is made from pork shoulder and pork ham, with no other scraps from the hog. Pork shoulder is considered a high-quality cut of pork today, although in 1937, it was not.

Does Spam taste like hot dogs? ›

What does SPAM taste like? Classic SPAM tastes like salty ham lunchmeat, with a moist and spongy texture similar to sausage patties. Newer versions of SPAM have a variety of spices, peppers, and additional ingredients that broaden the available flavors.

Who named Spam? ›

According to the company's Spam Museum, Ken Digneau, the brother of a Hormel executive, came up with the name — a portmanteau word for “spiced ham” — in a naming contest and got $100 as a reward. The new product was introduced on July 5, 1937.

Did soldiers eat Spam? ›

The difficulty of delivering fresh meat to the front during World War II saw Spam become a ubiquitous part of the U.S. soldier's diet. It became variously referred to as "ham that didn't pass its physical", "meatloaf without basic training", and "Special Army Meat".

Is corned beef a Spam? ›

Spam and corned beef are very different products in terms of their ingredients, textures, and flavors. Spam is a canned product made with pork shoulder and ham, while corned beef is a preserved meat product made using beef brisket that has been brined in salt and spices.

Does Spam contain milk? ›

Yes, Spam Lite Canned Meat is dairy-free.

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